Tutor Time: What can I learn in 10mins that will be useful for the rest of my life?

Today in Y12 tutor group I posed the question: What can I learn in 10mins that will be useful for the rest of my life? 

CAPTURE YOUR LIFE INSTRUCTIONS!

1.Take your phone out of your pocket.

2.Record a short clip of what is in front of you.

3.Repeat everyday.

4.Snip 1 second out of each clip and stitch them together.

CAPTURE YOUR LIFEScreen Shot 2014-11-25 at 8.03.11 AM

  • By the end of the year you will have a 6 minute condensed video of your life, which we will share during our tutor time starting at the end of May.
  • In 30 years you will have a 3 hour condensed video of your life.

SOME TIPS

  • Take landscape video clips rather than portrait.
  • Don’t worry if you don’t know how to edit videos. Just take the videos and learn how to edit them later.
  • Record 4-5 seconds of multiple events daily, if you like. You will then be able to choose which clips you would like to include in your final compilation.

EXAMPLE

Advertisements

Amazing DNA Models : Year 12 Biology HL

Year 12 Biology HL students were asked to create DNA models that illustrated their knowledge of the DNA structure. Here is the criteria that was given to the class:

Construct a model of the DNA molecule. Your final model must meet the following criteria:

1. It must be self-supporting, stand at least 30 cm high and have a diameter of at least 12 cm

2. It must clearly model the double helix structure of the DNA molecule

3. Each of the major components of the molecule (bases, sugar, phosphate) must be clearly recognizable using labeling, colour coding, shape, size, material or any combination of the above. Purines must be distinguished from pyrimidines.

4. 3’ and 5’ ends are shown

5. A minimum of six base pairs must be represented

6. Correct number of hydrogen bonds between base pairs must be demonstrated in the model

The models were a great success!

See images below.

DNA Models 1 DNA Models 2 Stephy DNA Model Year 12 DNA Models Group Pic

Article: Controlling Genes with your thoughts

Controlling genes with your thoughts

Date:
November 11, 2014
Source:
ETH Zurich
Summary:
Researchers have constructed the first gene network that can be controlled by our thoughts. Scientists have developed a novel gene regulation method that enables thought-specific brainwaves to control the conversion of genes into proteins (gene expression). The inspiration was a game that picks up brainwaves in order to guide a ball through an obstacle course.

It sounds like something from the scene in Star Wars where Master Yoda instructs the young Luke Skywalker to use the force to release his stricken X-Wing from the swamp: Marc Folcher and other researchers from the group led by Martin Fussenegger, Professor of Biotechnology and Bioengineering at the Department of Biosystems (D-BSSE) in Basel, have developed a novel gene regulation method that enables thought-specific brainwaves to control the conversion of genes into proteins — called gene expression in technical terms.

“For the first time, we have been able to tap into human brainwaves, transfer them wirelessly to a gene network and regulate the expression of a gene depending on the type of thought. Being able to control gene expression via the power of thought is a dream that we’ve been chasing for over a decade,” says Fussenegger.

A source of inspiration for the new thought-controlled gene regulation system was the game Mindflex, where the player wears a special headset with a sensor on the forehead that records brainwaves. The registered electroencephalogram (EEG) is then transferred into the playing environment. The EEG controls a fan that enables a small ball to be thought-guided through an obstacle course.

Wireless Transmission to Implant

The system, which the Basel-based bioengineers recently presented in the journalNature Communications, also makes use of an EEG headset. The recorded brainwaves are analysed and wirelessly transmitted via Bluetooth to a controller, which in turn controls a field generator that generates an electromagnetic field; this supplies an implant with an induction current.

A light then literally goes on in the implant: an integrated LED lamp that emits light in the near-infrared range turns on and illuminates a culture chamber containing genetically modified cells. When the near-infrared light illuminates the cells, they start to produce the desired protein.

Thoughts Control Protein Quantity

The implant was initially tested in cell cultures and mice, and controlled by the thoughts of various test subjects. The researchers used SEAP for the tests, an easy-to-detect human model protein which diffuses from the culture chamber of the implant into the mouse’s bloodstream.

To regulate the quantity of released protein, the test subjects were categorised according to three states of mind: bio-feedback, meditation and concentration. Test subjects who played Minecraft on the computer, i.e. who were concentrating, induced average SEAP values in the bloodstream of the mice. When completely relaxed (meditation), the researchers recorded very high SEAP values in the test animals. For bio-feedback, the test subjects observed the LED light of the implant in the body of the mouse and were able to consciously switch the LED light on or off via the visual feedback. This in turn was reflected by the varying amounts of SEAP in the bloodstream of the mice.

New Light-sensitive Gene Construct

“Controlling genes in this way is completely new and is unique in its simplicity,” explains Fussenegger. The light-sensitive optogenetic module that reacts to near-infrared light is a particular advancement. The light shines on a modified light-sensitive protein within the gene-modified cells and triggers an artificial signal cascade, resulting in the production of SEAP. Near-infrared light was used because it is generally not harmful to human cells, can penetrate deep into the tissue and enables the function of the implant to be visually tracked.

The system functions efficiently and effectively in the human-cell culture and human-mouse system. Fussenegger hopes that a thought-controlled implant could one day help to combat neurological diseases, such as chronic headaches, back pain and epilepsy, by detecting specific brainwaves at an early stage and triggering and controlling the creation of certain agents in the implant at exactly the right time.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by ETH Zurich. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marc Folcher, Sabine Oesterle, Katharina Zwicky, Thushara Thekkottil, Julie Heymoz, Muriel Hohmann, Matthias Christen, Marie Daoud El-Baba, Peter Buchmann, Martin Fussenegger. Mind-controlled transgene expression by a wireless-powered optogenetic designer cell implant. Nature Communications, 2014; 5: 5392 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6392

A New Way to Take Notes: Graphic Notes on iPad

One of my Year 12 Biology HL students uses this APP for creating her graphic notes during lessons.  GoodNotes 4 – Notes & PDF by Time Base Technology Limited allows students to take notes and annotate PDF documents. They will be synced to all your iOS devices automatically, thanks to iCloud. Mac client is coming soon.

Below is an example of my student’s work on our DNA topic – they are colorfully fantastic! Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 2.48.21 PM Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 2.48.28 PM Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 2.48.35 PM Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 2.48.42 PM Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 2.48.48 PM Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 2.48.56 PM Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 2.49.02 PM

We all FIT into the NO BULLY Zone

NO Bully Zone CollageAnti=bullying t-shirts

 

 

It’s Anti-Bullying week here at CGB, and our entire community is committed to anti-bullying and our leadership team will speak about the slogan, respect, leadership, acceptance, diversity, empathy, and the celebration of  life. In honor of anti-bullying week, a series of activities have been designed to encourage discussions about acceptance, tolerance, and what to do in the event of bullying. We also decided to devote one TOK lesson this week to anti-bullying. We started out the discussion with ‘How does bullying fit into our ways of knowing’?  We also asked students to share their personal experience with bullying -we asked: Were you ever bullied?, or Were you ever  a bully? The discussion today was surprising and beautiful. Some students shared their horrific experience of being bullied whilst others shared that they were in fact bullies. One student shared his story of being a part of a bully group where he and his friends placed a bag over another boys head and proceeded to punch and beat him. After sharing his story, he looked at a fellow student (who had previously shared a story of being bullied) and said that he wished he could go back and say ‘I’m sorry’. It was a magical moment and I’m so grateful that my students had the courage to share their experiences. Here is the TED Talk: To This Day … for the bullied and beautiful by Shane Koyczan that I shared during our seminar, which ultimately inspired our real and heartfelt discussion on bullying.

 

By turn hilarious and haunting, poet Shane Koyczan puts his finger on the pulse of what it’s like to be young and … different. “To This Day,” his spoken-word poem about bullying, captivated millions as a viral video (created, crowd-source style, by 80 animators). Here, he gives a glorious, live reprise with backstory and violin accompaniment by Hannah Epperson (TED.com).