TED Talk: I only listen to color

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Protein Synthesis Song

Year 12 Biology HL girls wrote this fabulous Protein Synthesis song (based on Pink’s -Just Give Me A Reason) – I loved it so much I had to post it here! It’s catchy! You are going to love it!

 

 

Merry Christmas from CGB Science Department!

Merry Christmas from the CGB Science department. This song was produced by our Year 2 children and the cast of our reindeer dancers are the teachers and lab technician from the science department.

 Hope you enjoy our Holiday Greetings!

Created by: Springs Pacelli

Teacher Appearances: Julio Ramos, Simon Halpin, Keith Rigby, Jennifer Lenz, Andy Bunt and Javier Martelo

First 3D Printer in Space!

The potential role of 3D printers in space has been an exciting concept. The machines could help pave the way for long-term space exploration because they give astronauts the ability to make what they need in space instead of bringing extra supplies onboard a spacThe potential role of 3D printers in space has been an exciting concept. The machines could help pave the way for long-term space exploration because they give astronauts the ability to make what they need in space instead of bringing extra supplies onboard a space shuttle or depending on supply missions to restock necessities, both of which limit the time and distance missions can take on. It means being able to fix things on the fly, create new parts and tools and make things as needs arise instead of trying to plan for everything. NASA is even exploring using moon rocks as a 3D printer material so that astronauts could build with the materials they have at hand. Knowing that, it’s pretty exciting that astronauts have officially made the first 3D printed object in space. The test was carried out aboard the International Space Station, which is serving as a laboratory for this technology in space. “This first print is the initial step toward providing an on-demand machine shop capability away from Earth,” said Niki Werkheiser, project manager for the International Space Station 3-D Printer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The printer was installed in the ISS on November 17 by NASA astronaut Barry “Butch” Wilmore. After a couple of tests and some tweaking, the printer was ready to manufacture its first object: a faceplate of the extruder’s casing. Not fancy, but it proves that the 3D printer can not only make useful objects for the astronauts, it can make replacement parts for itself too. The reasoning behind testing this first is that if 3D printers become critical parts of space exploration missions, printing parts for repairs for other tools and objects, they need to be able to make replacement parts for themselves too to keep the mission going. 3D printing, as is the case with other activities, is more difficult in space because of the effects of microgravity. Though the printing was successful, Wilmore noticed that the part adhesion on the tray was stronger than expected, which could mean layer bonding is different in microgravity. The team will have to figure out why and what to do about it with future printings. The ground team is doing most of the work on these printings so that the crew can focus on their other tasks. The team in Alabama is monitoring the printing process and trying to learn what things are affected by microgravity and what things are just part of the fine-tuning process for a printer. When the parts come back to the ground, they’ll analyze them and compare them to parts printed on Earth. You can watch a video about the initial tests of the 3D printer below.e shuttle or depending on supply missions to restock necessities, both of which limit the time and distance missions can take on. It means being able to fix things on the fly, create new parts and tools and make things as needs arise instead of trying to plan for everything. NASA is even exploring using moon rocks as a 3D printer material so that astronauts could build with the materials they have at hand. Knowing that, it’s pretty exciting that astronauts have officially made the first 3D printed object in space. The test was carried out aboard the International Space Station, which is serving as a laboratory for this technology in space. “This first print is the initial step toward providing an on-demand machine shop capability away from Earth,” said Niki Werkheiser, project manager for the International Space Station 3-D Printer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The printer was installed in the ISS on November 17 by NASA astronaut Barry “Butch” Wilmore. After a couple of tests and some tweaking, the printer was ready to manufacture its first object: a faceplate of the extruder’s casing. Not fancy, but it proves that the 3D printer can not only make useful objects for the astronauts, it can make replacement parts for itself too. The reasoning behind testing this first is that if 3D printers become critical parts of space exploration missions, printing parts for repairs for other tools and objects, they need to be able to make replacement parts for themselves too to keep the mission going. 3D printing, as is the case with other activities, is more difficult in space because of the effects of microgravity. Though the printing was successful, Wilmore noticed that the part adhesion on the tray was stronger than expected, which could mean layer bonding is different in microgravity. The team will have to figure out why and what to do about it with future printings. The ground team is doing most of the work on these printings so that the crew can focus on their other tasks. The team in Alabama is monitoring the printing process and trying to learn what things are affected by microgravity and what things are just part of the fine-tuning process for a printer. When the parts come back to the ground, they’ll analyze them and compare them to parts printed on Earth. You can watch a video about the initial tests of the 3D printer below.

All information was taken from: http://www.treehugger.com/gadgets/first-object-3d-printed-space.html

Mars-One: Would you take a one way trip to Mars?

Human Settlement on Mars Mars One will establish a permanent human settlement on Mars. Crews of four will depart Screen Shot 2014-12-02 at 9.04.45 AMevery two years, starting in 2024. Our first unmanned mission will be launched in 2018. Join the Global Mars One Community and participate in our mission to Mars. – See more at: http://www.mars-one.com/#sthash.S5t58baQ.dpuf.

Human Settlement on Mars Mars One designed a mission using only existing technology. In the coming years, a demonstration mission, communication satellites, two rovers and several cargo missions will be sent to Mars. A reliable living environment will be waiting for the astronauts when they leave Earth. – See more at: http://www.mars-one.com/#sthash.S5t58baQ.dpuf.

Astronaut Selection and Preparation The global search has begun for the first humans to set foot on Mars and make it their home. In an extensive training period, candidates will learn the skills they will need on Mars and on their journey there. The combined skill set of each astronaut team member will cover a very wide range of disciplines. In 1000 years, everyone on Earth will still remember who the first humans on Mars were. More than 200,000 men and women from around the world responded to the first call for astronauts. – See more at: http://www.mars-one.com/#sthash.S5t58baQ.dpuf

You Make It Happen The whole world will watch and experience this journey. We are all explorers. Everyone, including you, can participate in space exploration. This can be your mission to Mars! Join our global effort by sharing our vision with your friends, supporting us and perhaps becoming a Mars astronaut yourself. – See more at: http://www.mars-one.com/#sthash.S5t58baQ.dpuf

All information comes from: http://www.mars-one.com/. Please see this website for updates.